Japari students poised to soar despite Covid-19 hindrances

Japari students poised to soar despite Covid-19 hindrances

Japari students poised to soar despite Covid-19 hindrances

Most of us have no clear memory of any particular school term from our time at school. Many adults can recall specific years, and can place teachers with particular grades. We remember friends and might have a few social memories that stand out. Holidays are likely more vivid than classes. Break time conversations are better remembered than any particular lesson. All are adrift in a timeless ocean of school days, with little to no specific time landmarks as to when they took place.  School term memories all converge together. They run into each other with little to differentiate any one from another.

Second term 2020 will be very different. For parents, teachers and students alike, this term is unlikely to be forgotten. It will very likely be etched in the minds of all involved. Like other historic moments, the lockdown will evoke specific memories and act like a tent pole in our memories. Other memories from before and after will be measured against it. Reference to second term 2020 will orientate other memories.

 

Over 1.7 Billion Students affected by school closures

Covid-19 has meant that many children have not had the schooling input they needed. Some have adjusted well. They found the distance learning alternatives to work for them. Many more have realised as never before the need for face-to-face schooling.

At one time, about 99% of learners were affected by school closures worldwide. This is according to The United Nations Educational, Scientific and Cultural Organisation (UNESCO). To put that in perspective, that was 1.725 Billion students. In 1900 the entire world population was only 1.6 billion people.

This would be the largest amount of students affected by any one phenomenon in all of history. And the impact has been decidedly negative.

 

Coronavirus school closures have been negative for students around the world

Numerous studies have shown that the school closures will adversely affect student outcomes. The average student from the USA could fall behind by as much as seven months this academic year. Parents are already spending as much as $7 Billion a year in remedial education in the States. A setback like this can only make the situation worse.

There has been a study done showing how devastating losing periods of learning can be.  Learners had lost 3 months due to a natural disaster. They were found to be 18 months behind in their studies four years later. It seems that because they were behind on the curriculum when they started school again, they continued to fall further behind.

Developing countries are even more vulnerable. It has been observed that school closures even due to short-term reasons have adverse effects. These include loss of future income.

 

South Africa, education and Covid-19

South Africa’s public schooling system was already under severe strain. Many children attending these schools do not gain the skills schooling should teach. Literacy and numeracy are abysmal for most of the children at many government schools. 9 out 10 children who fall behind in the foundation phase of schooling are never able to catch up. South Africa as a whole is definitely not equipped to make up for the lost time in schooling.

 

The loss of Foundation Phase – Grade R to 3 – learning is astronomical

Again and again, the skills acquired in Grade R – 3 have been shown to be critical. They lay the foundation for learning success throughout a child’s school career. With the loss time at the most critical juncture, children at home are not learning to read and add as they should.

Grade R’s and 1’s have hardly done homework in the first term. It is quite unreasonable to assume that they are now putting in the hours of schooling they need from their bedrooms. Many parents also acknowledge that they are not trained to teach their children the fundamentals of maths and reading.

It might be understandable why government schools have focused on the return of Matric students, and grade 7’s. To adhere to social distancing the idea has been to concentrate on the standards that are finishing their schooling. These are the two grades moving to high school and tertiary education next year. So the Department would want them to complete their academic years as a priority. These pupils returned to school on the 8th June. It should have been the 1st of June. However, many department schools needed another week to prepare to be Covid-19 compliant. Another week of schooling lost.

But what seems to have been overlooked is the cardinal importance of the foundation phase. To delay its return might have been necessary, but it could prove devastating.

The foundation phase, along with other grades, has recently been announced to return on the 6th of July. Schools have been closed since the 18th of March. This means that these early learners have not had schooling for over three-and-a-half months. This is invaluable schooling time that they need to recoup. Without the literacy and numeracy fundamentals learnt at this stage, schooling could become an impossible challenge.

Many schools do not have the resources to adequately address the negative impact the lockdown has had. Their learners will not be given the support they need to see them flourish under these adverse circumstances.

 

Japari is the perfect school to make up for lost time

Japari offers the best solution for time lost in learning. It is an assisted mainstream learning environment. We have a long history of individualised learner support. We have been helping learners overcome their challenges for decades.

We are equipped to help primary school students reach their educational goals. We will assist pupils at whatever level they are. Gifted students will be given the platform to excel. Struggling students will get the support they need. We can assist your child to ensure that they do not lose 2020 as a year of fruitful schooling.

Each of our classes is never bigger than 15 students. This allows for very personalised input in the classroom. If your child is struggling to master a concept, this learning environment suits them perfectly. They will have the necessary attention to grasp whatever they might have misunderstood while under lockdown.

The foundation phase learners will get the crucial intervention they need. They will have the crucial classroom time they require to ensure a successful school career.

Japari has a strong multi-disciplinary team. It is comprised of experts to ensure that all our student’s needs are met. We are fully committed to being Covid-19 compliant, and are ready to welcome your child as soon as possible.

Japari also offers online tutoring and extra lessons. We can also accommodate specialised academic support after school for students from other institutions.

We have also had much experience in providing emotional support for leaners and parents. This has been a disruptive year. Children can be particularly vulnerable to the stresses that come with a global crisis. We offer support for both learners and parents, in these turbulent times.

Let our 54 years of experience work for you and your child. We offer reasonable, tax rebatable fees. Students are exposed unique reading programmes that foster a lifelong love for reading. We have excellent sporting and cultural activities. We are truly a nurturing learning institution that addresses the whole learner holistically.

We follow the CAPS curriculum. We are ISASA Registered and Umalusi Accredited. We are the school for you, whatever your needs. And we will ensure that your child is exactly on track to excel in their schooling career

We are ready

Bibliography/Further Reading:

 

https://en.unesco.org/covid19/educationresponse

 

https://www.nytimes.com/2020/06/05/us/coronavirus-education-lost-learning.html

 

https://www.reuters.com/investigates/special-report/health-coronavirus-usa-schools/

 

https://www.un.org/en/un-coronavirus-communications-team/united-nations-working-mitigate-covid-19-impact-children

 

https://theconversation.com/impact-of-school-closures-on-education-outcomes-in-south-africa-136889

 

https://theconversation.com/what-will-happen-to-school-grades-during-the-coronavirus-pandemic-135632

 

https://www.thoughtco.com/current-world-population-1435270

 

https://www.worldometers.info/world-population/world-population-by-year/

 

https://www.nytimes.com/2020/06/05/us/coronavirus-education-lost-learning.html

 

https://www.brookings.edu/blog/education-plus-development/2020/06/15/how-much-learning-may-be-lost-in-the-long-run-from-covid-19-and-how-can-mitigation-strategies-help/

 

https://www.riseprogramme.org/publications/working-paper-20039-human-capital-accumulation-and-disasters-evidence-pakistan

 

https://www.riseprogramme.org/publications/we-have-protect-kids

 

https://phys.org/news/2020-05-reveals-long-term-impact-disaster-related-school.html

 

https://www.cmi.no/publications/7214-impacts-of-school-closures-on-children-in-developing-countries-can-we-learn-something-from-the-past

 

https://www.educationnext.org/how-will-coronavirus-crisis-affect-childrens-learning-unequally-covid-19/

 

https://ewn.co.za/2020/05/31/no-school-on-monday-grade-7s-and-matrics-should-return-on-8-june-education-dept

 

https://www.news24.com/news24/southafrica/news/schools-reopening-under-lockdown-what-regulations-say-on-the-phased-return-of-pupils-20200623

 

https://www.thejakartapost.com/news/2020/06/09/south-african-schools-reopen-after-march-lockdown-eased-.html

 

https://www.gov.za/about-sa/school-calendar

 

https://ewn.co.za/2020/03/23/covid-19-could-the-school-year-be-lost-for-sa-pupils

 

https://www.timeslive.co.za/news/south-africa/2020-04-22-poll–can-the-2020-academic-year-be-saved/

 

https://ewn.co.za/2020/06/24/motshekga-officials-working-hard-to-ensure-all-schools-covid-19-compliant

 

https://www.dailymaverick.co.za/article/2020-06-16-new-study-supports-all-sa-children-returning-to-schools-and-creches-immediately/#gsc.tab=0